WE FLEW TO BOSTON.  WE THEN RENTED A CAR AND DROVE TO

BAR HARBOR, MAINE (ONE OF THE FAMOUS MARINAS ALONG

WITH ACADIA NATIONAL PARK) AND SPENT OVERNIGHT

BEFORE WE TOOK A FERRY IN THE EARLY NEXT MORNING.

TOUR MAP (CLICK ON THE MAP TO ENLARGE.)

CAT FERRY FROM BAR HARBOR, MAINE TO

YARMOUTH, NOVA SCOTIA FOR MORE THAN 4 HOURS

HERE WE ARE IN YARMOUTH, NOVA SCOTIA.

PEGGY'S COVE IS ABOUT 43 KILOMETERS SOUTHWEST OF

DOWNTOWN HALIFAX.  IT IS ONE OF MOST POPULAR STOPS FOR

TOURISTS.  According to legend, Peggy'S Cove was named

after the only survivor of a schooner that ran aground

and sank in 1800'S.  a woman named MargAret.  Local folk

called her "Peggy" and her home came to be known as

Peggy's Cove.   Known as the idyllic fishing village,

Peggy's Cove IS Set on rocky shores, the lighthouse and

village at Peggy's Cove are a photographer's paradise.

Despite its popularity this tiny fishing village has been

able keep the same relaxed atmosphere that has made

it famous.  Peggy's Cove is certainly one of Canada's gems.

A really good museum about Nova Scotia's

relationship with the sea. There's also a good

exhibition about the Titanic with some artifacts

like a deck chair. There are a few hundred of the

Titanic victims buried in two cemeteries here,

Fairview and the Jewish Cemetery.  There is also a detailed

exhibit on the Halifax Explosion that happened in 1917.

FAIRVIEW CEMETERY WHERE SOME TITANIC VICTIMS WERE BURIED.

ANOTHER FERRY TO PRINCE EDWARD ISLAND

Green Gables, located in Cavendish in the Prince

Edward Island National Park, is a popular tourist

destination. Each year hundreds of thousands of

visitors from around the world visit the site which

inspired the setting for L.M. Montgomery to create her

beloved tale of a red-haired orphan, Anne of Green Gables.

WHAT DOES '?' MEAN?

A BARN?  NO, IT MEANS VISITOR'S/INFORMATION CENTER.

YOU COME IN AND ASK QUESTIONS.  IT IS EVERYWHERE!

The Prince Edward Island Potato Museum is located in

the community of O'Leary in the western part of Canada's

smallest province. It is surrounded by fertile potato

growing fields where the humble potato has played an

important role in the economy for many years.  The

museum depicts an interesting display of the potato

industry, and houses a large collection of farm

implements and machinery related to the growing and

harvesting of potatoes. In fact, this museum contains

the largest exhibit of potato artifacts in the world!

In 1999 a major expansion was constructed to

accommodate the Potato Hall of Fame, the

extraordinary national Amazing Potato Exhibit, and

incorporates the Community Museum. The building now

covers over 7000 square feet and is air conditioned for

your comfort. Collectors of the curious will be pleased

to find a recently added giant sculptured potato at

the entrance to the museum. The complex includes other

attractions on site such as the Heritage Chapel, the

Log Barn and the Little Red Schoolhouse.

BOTTLE HOUSES IN Cap-Egmont (CITY NAME)

The first bottle house was built in 1980 out of approximately

12,000 bottles; it measures 20 feet x 14 feet with three main

sections. Its six gables and the patterns produced by the

careful choosing of colors and sizes of bottles truly makes

this a unique building. Mr. Arsenault* would cement between

300 and 400 bottles per row, using a total of approximately

85 bags of cement over a six month period.

*Who is Edouard Arsenault?

Edouard was born in 1914, son of Emmanuel and Roséline

Arsenault of Cap-Egmont where he lived all his life, except

for the years he served in the Second World War with the

8th N.B. Princess Louise Hussars in the United Kingdom, the

Central Mediterranean area and Continental Europe (1941-1946).

Fisherman by trade, at first with his father Emmanuel and

later on his own, Édouard also worked as a carpenter during

the non-fishing seasons most of his life, including boat

building and construction work. In 1948, he married Rosina

Leclerc of Urbainville, P.E.I. For several years, they resided

in the Cap-Egmont lighthouse where Edouard served as

the last resident lighthouse keeper. Their two elder

children, Yvette and Réjeanne - the present owner of the

Bottle Houses, were raised there for a few years until

such time as the lighthouse was automated in 1957; the family

then moved to the residence presently on the grounds of

the Bottle Houses and two sons, Maurice and Pierre, were

born shortly afterwards.  Edouard's strong Acadian roots

also led him to contribute greatly to the development of

the Evangeline area, his home community.  Even after his

retirement, his creative energy and his sense of humour,

very much Acadian, were channelled in his architectural

project of transforming over 25,000 bottles into the

colorful souvenirs he has left for all of us to admire.

The chapel

The third building constructed by the late Édouard

Arsenault is truly a work of art. Approximately 10,000

bottles were transformed in 1983 to become a magnificent

little chapel, complete with pews and altar. At the time of

his sudden death at the age of 70, in the spring of 1984,

Mr. Arsenault still had a bit of work to do: he intended to

make the steeples higher and the front pew was not quite

completed. At sunset, a symphony of light and colors

streams in from behind the altar. Visitors are likely to

sense a feeling of peace and tranquility as they

admire the final chapter of Arsenault's work.

Confederation Bridge is currently the longest bridge in

the world over ice covered salt water. It is part of the

Trans-Canada Highway in the Atlantic Provinces region

of Eastern Canada. The bridge connects Prince Edward

Island with the mainland at New Brunswick.

Construction on the bridge began in the fall of 1993.

Lobbying for a bridge across Northumberland Strait had

been an issue for years. Since 1873, access to P.E.I. had been

by ferry. As the population grew and tourism increased, so did

the cost of operating the ferry service. In the winter the

ferry service was affected by freezing arctic winds and ice

jams which caused delays and cancellations. By the 1990s

modern technology made construction of a bridge feasible.

Building the bridge was a challenge that included civil

engineering, marine and ocean engineering, and geomatics. It

was completed over a four year period with over 2000 people

working on it at most any given time. The piers were modeled

after the shape of ice-breaker hulls. The cone shaped base

causes thick sheets of ice to break apart upon impact and flow

around the pier. The arrangement of the piers and the rest

of the structure was designed to have the least amount

of impact on the surrounding environment.

The spans of the bridge are of a concrete box girder

design. There are 65 seperate sections that were

constructed on land and then transported to their final

location by a "floating crane". One of the largest marine

cranes in the world was brought in from Denmark to float

the massive sections into the strait where they were

precisely set in place using satellite global positioning.

The bridge was designed to last 100 years in the harsh

climate and to withstand impacts from passing ships.

The bridge opened in the spring of 1997. The 12 minute trip

across the 12.9 kilometers of bridge was much shorter

than the three hour trip by ferry. The two lanes are

monitored 24/7 by Strait Crossing Bridge Limited, the

company that operates and maintains the Confederate

Bridge. Emergency call boxes are spaced 750 meters

apart across the bridge. There are also video cameras on

the bridge and it is patrolled regularly to assist any

motorists experiencing a problem. The toll for 2003 is

$38.50 for an automobile which is less than the cost of

taking the ferry. A motorcyle toll costs $15.25. The only

time a toll is collected is when you leave Prince

Edward Island to return to the mainland.

nOTE: THERE IS A TALK ABOUT USING SAME DESIGN FOR A NEW

BRIDGE BETWEEN ALASKA AND rUSSIA.

The spectacle of the Reversing Falls takes place

just before the St. John River enters the Bay of

Fundy at Saint John, New Brunswick. The Reversing

Falls are caused when the river has to pass

through a narrow gorge and by the huge rise

and fall of the tides in the Bay of Fundy.
FOR MORE INFORMATION, CHECK OUT AT

http://www.mcuniverse.com/The-Reversing-Falls.114.0.html

THE SUMMER HOUSE OF OUR FORMER

U.S. PRESIDENT FRANKLIN D. ROOSEVELT

WE ARE BACK TO BAR HARBOR, MAINE.

ON CADILLAC MOUNTAINS AT ACADIA NATIONAL PARK;

CITY OF BAR HARBOR IN THE BACKGROUND

OUR LAST FRESH SEAFOOD TREAT;

WE SAT AT TOP DECK AND RIGHT CORNER.

THE CAT FERRY IS RUNNING PAST US.  ITS ROUTE REPEATS!

ONE OF OUR COLLECTIONS:

CAPTAIN "OLD SALTY" SAYS

"GOOD BYE AND HOPE TO SEE YOU AGAIN."